Inspired by music, driven by passion...

Watch our exclusive video with Wretch 32 below.

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As he coolly glides through the familiar streets of his native Tottenham, returning hero Wretch 32 is reflecting on the ambition and enterprise that opened up a world far beyond N17, and the abiding love for music that delivered him there. Here, among the kebab shops and barbers he fondly points out, is where it all began.

“Everything I have heard or seen has affected me and moulded how I am and moulded what I make,” he tells Clash, “so I honestly have to give all of the credit to where I grew up, because without me seeing and being a part of the most influential moments in my life, I doubt I would have this story to tell. Had I grown up somewhere else, it would have been a completely different story… I definitely think Tottenham has a lot to do with the sound of music I make, the style of music I make, and the story of the music I make.”

He’s behind the wheel of an iconic and mighty machine - guiding the sturdy width of an immaculate new Rolls-Royce through the streets he grew up on. This particular model is a Wraith ‘Inspired By Music’, named for its remarkable Bespoke Audio system (“the most exhaustively designed sound system in automotive history,” the brand proudly say), which boasts a 1300W, 18 channel system that blasts out of two bass speakers, seven tweeters and seven mid-range speakers that are strategically placed throughout the car’s interior. The dedication and meticulous care that went into the development of this majestic motor and its intricate details - such as the polished copper speaker grilles - is palpable in the driving experience, and motivates our driver to discuss his own commitment to the cause.

“Music is the only thing that I kinda stuck at because I never felt like I was working,” he admits. “You know like we all want to become footballers? But, for me, going out and playing in the cold or training or whatever was a bit of a drag. But I would always want to listen to music or make music or mess around and write songs. It’s funny; when people say you’re destined to do something, I do believe that music was definitely was something that I was destined to do.”

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The young Jermaine Scott Sinclair forged his musical path as an MC in the grime collective The Movement, before adopting the Wretch 32 moniker and releasing a series of mixtapes and, in 2008, a debut album, ‘Wretchrospective’, whose promise steered him into the BBC’s Sound Of 2011 and the wider attentions of nation. His second album, ‘Black And White’, featured an appearance from Ed Sheeran, alongside emerging names Etta Bond, Daley and Angel, whose patronage Wretch is proud to support. “I remember being the artist that wanted someone who was, at the time, a bigger act than me to reach out to. I wanted someone to give me a leg up or bring me on tour,” he explains. “So just remembering being that person, I feel like once I got into a position where I was able to work or to bring new people through, I think that it was the right thing to do. I think I get more of a buzz out of introducing the world to someone than I do just collaborating with someone that everybody knows.”

Currently frustrated at the delays hampering the release of third album, ‘Growing Over Life’, Wretch is nevertheless excited by the thriving UK grime scene and its growing international stature, citing the successes of Skepta, Krept & Konan and Clash 100 cover star Stormzy as representative of its rude health. “It’s good,” he says, “because they’re keeping it authentic, so people are getting to hear the best version of grime.”

Wretch’s place in the pantheon of UK grime lords is ensured by his talents as a wordsmith and the respect of his craft. His is a message for the streets from the streets, and never wavers in its resolution. “I think your message and your songs are the only things that are going to last,” he reasons. “No one is going to care about your haircut, no one is going to care about what jacket you wore; they’re going to care about the songs that they remember and what you stood for. It’s equally as important as the music to stand by who you are and to stand by your beliefs.”

He’s resolutely devoted to his hometown, and stands as a towering example of the possibilities available to the next generation of “council estate” kids like him. His enduring links to the community serve to honour the respect he has for the area, and the gratitude he feels for the support and motivation he received early in his career. Wretch is involved with the local under-14s football club, continues to work with and mentor young artists from the area, frequents the same barbers and cafes, and regularly helps arrange community fun days for kids. He makes himself available to talk to anyone that approaches him for advice, and even has plans for a performing arts school for the area. “There [are so many] talented kids that don’t get opportunities for whatever reason, and I just want to be the bridge,” he enthuses. “Now I’m in this position, I want to be able to spread the knowledge and help people turn their dreams into reality.”

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As he gracefully pulls into the parking space by his house, Wretch 32 takes a final moment to relax in the comfort of his luxurious surroundings, connecting his phone to the car stereo to test its formidable volume. He’s impressed. He’s reminded of the model’s name, and just before he exits, reviews his own journey that was ‘Inspired By Music’: “[Music] just gave us a sense of something,” he smiles, “like there was a goal that was achievable. We’d seen So Solid do it, we’d seen Dizzee Rascal, we’d seen Kano, and we’re like, ‘It’s possible, man.’ You cling on to that, and you go for it. It’s a beautiful thing, man, because without that, I don’t know what I’d be doing. We didn’t think we had a purpose, we didn’t think we were special; we just thought we was like everyone else, and we just didn’t know what to do with our time and we didn’t know what to do with our life, but this really came in and really saved the day. It’s funny; I used to hear people say that, like, ‘Football saved my life,’ or ‘Music saved my life,’ and I’m thinking, ‘How can music save your life?’ And I really understand now, because without this I don’t know what I’d be doing and I don’t know where I would be. This actually gave me a reason to live, as well as my children.”

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The Rolls-Royce Wraith: Inspired By Music is the ultimate music venue. Perfectly crisp Rolls-Royce Bespoke Audio makes it feel as though the artist is right there beside you. Available to order in dealerships now, or for further details please visit www.rolls-roycemotorcars.com

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