Exclusive: Robert Schneider talks to ClashMusic

Apples In Stereo mainman Robert Scheider has spoken to ClashMusic about the band's new album.

Formed in the early 90s Apples In Stereo went against every trend going. Much too left-field for the mainstream they fought back against the grunge onslaught with stunning harmonies and perfectly arranged baroque pop.

Taking influence from prime era Brian Wilson the band formed the nucleus of the Elephant 6 collective, with Apples In Stereo becoming cult heroes. Hooking up with none other than Elijah Wood for their 2007 album 'New Magnetic Wonder' the group reached a new level of recognition.

Perhaps their definitive statement to date, Apples In Stereo recently gave fans a handy recap on fifteen years of music in the form of '#1 Hits Explosion'. Bringing together little known tracks with prominent singles it was a handy reminder of songwriter Robert Schneider's pop talent.

Speaking to ClashMusic, the eccentric singer revealed that the band's forthcoming album sounds "like pop futurism".

"The musical kind of palette on the new record is futuristic. We’re trying to make an overtly futuristic record – it’s like pop futurism" he claimed.

"A little bit soul songs, through a kind of ELO filter. A retro futuristic pop R&B record. I’m pretty happy with it. I originally wanted it to sound like a UFO coming down at the end of ‘Close Encounters Of The Third Kind’ when they’re playing music only the music they’re playing will be retro-futuristic pop music."

Which clears that up. Continuing the singer said: "It’s really different. It’s different from the last album – maybe one toe is planted in ‘Same Old Drag’. It’s so much more baroque and so much more pop than the last record."

"It’s so much more baroque pop than the last record that it has the same relationship that ‘New Magnetic Wonder’ has to ‘Velocity Of Sound’. Maybe not as drastic as that but similar, anyway."
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