This Is What Socially Distanced Raving Is Actually Like

This Is What Socially Distanced Raving Is Actually Like

Clash journeys to Brixton Courtyard to check it out...

On Saturday just gone (July 18th) Clash headed down to Brixton Courtyard to check out its highly anticipated Socially Distant Socials series.

London promoters Percolate are behind these events, and are hell bent on giving an up-yours to COVID five nights a week throughout July. With an impressive roster of artists on the bill (Friendly Fires, Norman Jay MBE, Krywald & Farrer and Kiara Scuro to name a few), Percolate have pulled out all the stops to make the first parties back from lockdown ones to remember.

- - -

- - -

Arriving at Brixton Courtyard, it was clear that the number one priority was safety. Although there was a queue on entry, we were kept metres apart from other groups and sanitiser was a must. It was almost comforting that water bottles had to be emptied before going in – some things never change.

Brixton Courtyard was once the smoking area of Brixton Jamm, but you would never be able to tell. The organisers had put great effort into decorating the space, while keeping groups apart on separate picnic benches. Ordering food and drinks was incredibly simple: scan a QR code on your phone and a HausParty Collective flatbread and pint were on your table within minutes. Although this process was strange, not fighting it out at the bar was a novelty that we could grow to miss in the future.

- - -

- - -

The day was headlined by NTS Radio hero Moxie, with Louise Chen and Errol supporting. This was many of the DJs’ first gigs back out of lockdown, and definitely most of our first “out out" nights since March. This gave the day a general warm fuzzy feeling – it felt a far cry from those so-bored-I’m-going-to-cry Saturday nights at the height of lockdown.

It was also reassuring to see each of the three DJs having a great time, back behind the decks playing to a real-life crowd. The noise level wasn’t as loud as you’d expect; perhaps an effort from the organisers to discourage people getting up from their tables to dance. Despite this, it was clear everyone – from the staff, to the DJs, to the punters – was just happy to be back out listening to good music. 

The music industry is at a pretty critical juncture: venues are facing closure, livelihoods are under threat and Kanye is (maybe) running for President. However, nights like Saturday are a great example of how, with the ingenuity of promoters and venues and the support of fans, the music community can pick itself up and come back fighting.

- - -

- - -

Words: Sophie Church

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

 

Follow Clash

Buy Clash Magazine