Electronic artist picks his favourite soundtracks...
Luke Abbott

Luke Abbott seems to thrive on new challenges.

The producer was recently asked to score The Goob, a British film due to receive general release from May 29th.

The soundtrack seems able to act as a document in its own right. Picking up on last year's 'Wysing Forest', Abbott's work has already been lauded – with the score winning Best Soundtrack at the prestigious Stockholm Film Festival.

Released on Monday (May 25th) as 'Music For A Flat Landscape', it's a wonderfully engrossing work, full of cinematic splendour and moments of odd, spectral beauty.

Ahead of its release, Luke Abbott kindly guided Clash through five of his favourite film scores.

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There Will Be Blood - Jonny Greenwood
A big part of why I like this so much is because of how well everything is recorded. On good speakers, the sense of space is amazing, but it's not too glossy, like some orchestral recordings can be. There's a kind of naked quality to the sound, everything sounds close up and very natural. I enjoy how the sharp overtones really cut through; it's the kind of sound that subtly puts you on edge.

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Brazil - Michael Kamen
It's one of my favourite films, and the music is such huge part of it. The eponymously titled track is used as the coda to this surreal, dystopian world of administration and it's revisited throughout the film with different musical treatments.

Fundamentally it's such a jolly and optimistic piece of music, but it becomes like a dark and twisted nursery rhyme by the end of the film.The music is overblown and theatrical, and it needs to be that in order to work within the context of Gilliam's nightmarish world.

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The Social Network - Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross
I really like the Gone Girl soundtrack they did as well, but The Social Network soundtrack has 'Hand Covers Bruise' on it, which is a great track and really sets the tone for the whole movie.

There's a lot about the texture of this music which works well for films. The changes in pace and overall atmosphere are achieved by layering distorted textures with cleaner ones, parts jump out on top of the whole mix and everything shifts into a new space. I think it's a modern classic synth-soundtrack.

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Blade Runner - 'Vangelis'
It's the ultimate sci-fi synth soundscape, and the music is such a huge part of what makes that world feel so complete. That brassy lead sound from the CS80, it encapsulates that whole film noir atmosphere - it's kind of sleazy and grandiose.

When you first meet Rachel, at Tyrell's headquarters, there are these high synthesised chimes or small bells that are mixed in amongst the foley sound, they make me think of metal and I begin to imagine the texture of cold metal. It's like an audible forewarning of events in the movie.

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The Wicker Man - Paul Giovanni
I've always felt sympathy for the villagers in this film; I think I'm on their side. The music is enchanting and sinister and 'Willow's Song' is just the most beautiful sound. Folk music has such a deep history, and in this film it's used to help build that sense of tradition and that feeling that remote villages have. It's a kind of old magick, something that's passed on through generations.

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'Music For A Flat Landscape' is out on May 25th.

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