"It's Definitely More Accepted Now" AM On The Future Of Drill

"It's Definitely More Accepted Now" AM On The Future Of Drill

Up close with this electrifying South London artist...

Now a seasoned artist in the UK drill scene, it was only a matter of time before AM brought out his first solo project. Titled ‘Mally’, the record is packed with menacing melodies and hard-hitting beats. The Brixton rapper sounds composed on each of the tracks, as he explores the depth of drill music and what it has to offer. Known for his work with long-time collaborator Skengdo, it’s refreshing to hear AM branch out and focus on his own music.

Clash got the chance to catch up with the rapper to hear more about ‘Mally’ and the future of the UK drill sound.

- - -

- - -

For his first project, AM is happy it’s finally been released, commenting: “It’s definitely good because it’s been there for a while, I was just itching to get it out. I’ve definitely enjoyed the reception, it’s better than what I expected so it’s good”.

On a few of the tracks, AM steers away from the full-bled drill music and tries his hand at experimenting and bringing in different influences. This can be heard on ‘Love Is Hate’, where AM mixes in a blend of R&B music “This is something I want to do more definitely, I’m just trying to explore different melodies but make it as natural as possible and flow with my sound”. Further experimentation can be heard on ‘I Ain't A Yardie’, where AM adds a reload just as the song gets going, creating hype and a sense of confidence, knowing that the track is a banger.

With it being AM’s first project on his own, it meant a different approach when curating the album, he explains: “I intentionally made it personal to myself, with the types of songs I chose and made sure it was all cohesive so it flows as one”.

- - -

- - -

This is something that AM did exceptionally well, as the album feels like a whole piece of work on its own. Constructing well from one song to the next. The rapper has been pleased to see posters for the album in the likes of countries including Australia; “There’s quite a few fans in Australia and around Europe, in the likes of Netherlands and Sweden. Also, there’s a poster up in Brixton, my local area, so it feels good to see posters for it around there”.

As drill music has evolved in the UK, it’s become popular outside of the UK, creating other subcultures in different countries. Speaking on this, AM is pleased with how far it’s come: “Yeah it’s good to see, and it's good that UK music is being recognised. I think drill is one of the biggest genres to come out of the UK. Now there’s more people taking in the sound and listening to it”.

It was two years ago that AM and Skengdo were given a suspended prison sentence for performing a UK drill song. Since then the artists have spoken out in parliament for the injustice given to drill artists, as they became the latest scapegoat for the government. Over the past year, the drill sound is now more accepted into society, with AM commenting: “Especially the different types of drill sounds coming out of the UK, there’s more mainstream drill that’s getting into bigger places. It’s definitely more accepted now than it was before. I just see it getting bigger, with a lot of sub genres coming out of it”.

Since the album, AM has continued to put in the work with his latest freestyle for lockdown sessions. Whether we’ll next hear more music on his own or back with Skengo, we’re looking forward to seeing what's next.

- - -

- - -

'Mally' is out now.

Words: Joe Hale / @Jalewrites

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

 

Follow Clash

Buy Clash Magazine