Aaryan Banthia feels things deeply.

A songwriter who leads with his heart, he matches deeply honest lyricism to a desire to construct ear-worm melodies.

Returning to his home city of Mumbai recently, Aaryan decided to shoot a simple live clip on the street.

A passing crowd gathered, eager to hear what he was about to play – and then he dropped a surprise.

'Best Day Of My Life' is about the past and how it leads to the present, a song about first love, and how deeply it can cut.

“Your first love is always the most special, though they say it doesn't always last forever,” he explains. “‘Best Day Of My Life’ is about a first love remaining strong till the end of time and how seeing each other for the first time was the best day of their lives.”

Delivered in a charming, self-effacing way, 'Best Day Of My Life' neatly connects Aaryan with where he's from, and where he's going.

Tune in now.

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Electronic producer Prince Paris returns with sizzling new Willa collaboration 'Slow Down'.

The club figure has a knack for coaxing out incredible performances from his guests, and this new single is no exception.

Out now, 'Slow Down' is a vivid return, balancing his surging, house-leaning elements with those stellar vocals from Willa.

The singer reimagines the song, adding something highly personal to Prince Paris' kinetic digitalism.

"This song is about the intoxicating feeling of when you meet someone you KNOW is dangerous for your heart, but there's no way you're going to slow things down despite that. The ultimate rush.”

Tune in now.

Prince Paris · Prince Paris – Slow Down (Ft. Willa)

Photo Credit: Victor Le

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From the outside, New York is a colossal, almost infinite space, a warren of streets, alleys, communities, and boroughs. The lived experience, though, is a little different – in each locality, the boundaries are tightly defined, meaning that in real terms, almost everybody in your area will know everybody else.

It’s worth keeping in mind when looking at the twin trajectories of Nas and JAY-Z. Two iconic rappers of a similar age, and from a similar areas – Queens – Nas broke out first, with his iconic debut album ‘Illmatic’ remaining the LP most often cited as rap’s finest. JAY-Z emerged from the shadow of Biggie Smalls, and when he gained the limelight he never let go – currently a billionaire, he’s without doubt one of the most commercially successful musicians of his or any other era.

Yet for almost two decades the pair couldn’t be in the same room. What started as friendly rivalry broke out into a war of words, with the Nas vs JAY-Z conflict standing as one of hip-hop’s longest lasting grandstand bouts.

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Friction was there from the start. Nas skipped out on a session for Hov’s debut album ‘Reasonable Doubt’, causing the production to simply lift a vocal sample in lieu of any new bars. Nas took this as a slight, and when his second album ‘It Was Written’ arrived it featured a friendly shot at JAY-Z, and his habit of driving a lexus with TVs installed on the inside.

The sparring match continued in a respectful fashion, until Roc-A-Fella artist Memphis Bleek was dragged into the centre. The JAY-Z protégé echoed – intentionally or otherwise – ‘Nas Is Like…’ on his single ‘Memphis Bleek Is…’ causing Nas to fire back with his lyrics on ‘Nastradamus’ cut ‘What You Think Of That’: "I need an encore y'all, you should welcome me back/You wanna ball till you fall? I can help you with that."  

It was Memphis Bleek, then, who arguably fired the first full shot of the Nas vs JAY-Z beef. His song ‘My Mind Right’ took aim at Nas and his faltering position post debut album, sparking the ‘Stillmatic’ reply, which drew Hov into the rapper’s sights: “Is he H to the Izzo, M to the Izzo?”

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Refusing to hold back, JAY-Z used a Hot 97 Freestyle to speak his mind, tearing down his one-time friend and rap peer. Finessing the freestyle for ‘Takover’ on his 2001 album ‘The Blueprint’, he ripped Nas apart, labelling him a has-been who only has a good album every decade. Coming at a career low for his Queens rival, the words must have stung deep.

Rising to the challenge, Nas recorded ‘Ether’ which remains an unusually brutal moment in his catalogue. Swapping the Shakespearean dalliances of his debut for visceral street poetry, he called JAY-Z a sell-out, underlined Hov’s faltering start to his career, employed some homophobic slurs, and accused his Queens contemporary of misogyny. All in all, a firestorm: "Y'all n*ggas deal with emotions like bitches/ What's sad is I love you cause you're my brother, you traded your soul for riches."

This is when the beef gets messy. Potshots come from all angles, with members of both rapper’s crews getting involved. ‘Supa Ugly’ saw JAY-Z bragging about a three-year long affair with Nas’ girlfriend Carmen Bryan, which sparked an unlikely peace figure – Hov’s mother dialled into to Hot 97 to request her son behave himself.

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Ultimately, it all came back to New York, and to their homes. In the cauldron of Queens, sides were taken, with stations such as Hot 97 playing the diss tracks back to back and encouraging listeners to phone in. JAY-Z attacked Nas on ‘The Blueprint 2’ sparking Nas to call him a footnote on hip-hop history with his reflective but brutal ‘The Last Real N*gga Alive’.

And then it fizzled out. JAY-Z retired, altered the spelling of his name, and then came back. Nas took time out, after a spell producing records that were arguably beneath his name. JAY-Z became showbiz royalty, launching TIDAL, and became a billionaire. To a new generation, the 90s heat that spawned the Queens pairing was a distant memory, with platforms such as SoundCloud affording a new, national (and international) approach.

Today, the two are once more back in parallel. JAY-Z took on ageing, guilt, loss, and survival with ‘4:44’ carving out a fresh identity for himself with his most creative album in a decade. Nas re-built his throne, with ‘The King’s Disease’ excising those inconsistent Millennial experiments for something more rounded.

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Perhaps that’s why they’ve finally been able to bury the hatchet. True elder statesmen, they’ve moved beyond that youthful need to trace your progress by competing against others. Last night – April 29th – JAY-Z shared a specially curated playlist dedicated to Nas’ music on TIDAL. This morning, the two appeared on the swaggering DJ Khaled cut ‘SORRY NOT SORRY’.

Nas’ verse is particularly revealing, discussing his finances, and revealing the extent of his gains through Bitcoin. And perhaps that’s the key, here – when Nas and JAY-Z first ended the beef back in 2005, they appeared together in New Jersey. JAY-Z told the crowd: "All that beef shit is done, we had our fun… Let's get this money."

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At the beginning of the video for Body Meat’s 'Ultima' – a hyperactive rush of mutated pop with dextrous, dense rhythms – a woman’s voice speaks out over the footage of a rundown trailer that’s battling subsummation from the surrounding woodland undergrowth. This dusty steel box is situated outside the tiny Maryland, US town of Elkton and was home to Body Meat’s Chris Taylor, alongside his sister and mother, for two years of a childhood that was punctuated by repeated upheaval, financial and emotional hardships.

The woman speaking, however, is positive about that time. “That trailer thing was beautiful” she says in the clip. “It was about the energy of the space that the building was on.”

She returns after the song has finished. “It was free… right?” She reminisces. “We slept with the door unlocked.”

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The voice is Taylor’s mother, Carol: an environmental scientist who at that time was part-powering their temporary home with a self-invented renewable energy machine, while being a single mum with two kids. “That woman, I don’t how she did it” Taylor sighs back in the present day, pausing to look away from his laptop camera in his apartment in Philadelphia. “'Ultima' was meant as a thank you. Because I knew that she had done the best she could. She found this energy to help us survive.”

With an emotional fragility that contrasts with the kind of beat complexity you might hear on a Jlin track, Ultima is arguably the centrepiece of the latest Body Meat EP 'Year Of The Orc'; but it’s far from the beginning and end of Taylor’s attempts to re-connect and re-conceptualise his past on record.

Over five years of output on his Bandcamp page he’s signposted this direction, from the skeletal beginnings of the synapse-snapping flurry of rhythms and breakneck changes in song structure, via lo-fi instrumentals that gradually become more digitalised with each release. Now he’s arrived at 'Year Of The Orc': a culmination of an internal battle and attempt to find peace with his childhood.

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It’s a journey that took the Utah-born artist from trailer homes in Maryland to Philadelphia via San Francisco and Denver. In particular, he credits moving from Denver to his current home as kickstarting what he was doing musically, finding kindred spirits in artists such as mercurial art rockers Palm – who found him his apartment in Philadelphia and even gave him and his partner a hand moving in – Saddle Creek three-piece Spirit Of The Beehive and Infinity Dance Complex’s Matt Anderegg, the latter of whom Taylor has also played alongside in the equally idiosyncratic guitar pop group Mothers.

“I have great friends in Denver still, but I’d gotten to the point where I had pretty much locked myself away in my room working on my music because there weren’t too many opportunities” he explains. “Because of that people there can be very, like ‘well whatever, we’ll make music and party and work some jobs. Which is totally fair! It’s just that I don’t party.”

Taylor suffers ongoing anxiety issues that he’s had to seek help for over the years, but music has also been a way to channel it. He frequently describes borderline obsessive behaviours around practice and production of music during our conversation – from spending hours working on a vocal take for just ten seconds of a track, to rehearsing all day in the build up to a live show to the point where he was exhausted before he’d set foot on stage. He manages that better now, he says, but he’s also keen to point out the healing qualities such a focus on his craft has provided for him.

“Music doesn’t come easy to me” he says modestly. “I turned down a lot of stuff in Denver, and maybe people thought I was stuck up, but I just needed to be inside working on stuff 12 hours a day when I could before and after work, coming home and only making music, only practising. Then when I got to Philly it was like everyone was doing that all the time as well! If my friends and me see each other, it’s when we’re showing each other our music. What makes the Philadelphia scene so good too is that we’ll call up on each other and be, like ‘I have this part that sounds wild, I don’t know if it’s too extra or not’ and most of the time people are like ‘that’s insane, keep going keep going’”.

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Listening to Body Meat, it’s no surprise that an atmosphere so conducive to a maximalist way of thinking has been fertile for the project. 'Year Of The Orc' is a rush of endorphins; opener Twigs is early 90s R&B sped up to warp speed, pitch-manipulated and left to fend for itself among its creator’s insatiable appetite to twist and change rhythmic direction. This Is Something mixes trap with early 00s pop production, vocal samples that spring up like a jack-in-a-box and vocal melodies that fall over cliff edges only to find the energy soar back upwards on impact. Even on Ghost, which features veteran American musical shapeshifter Laaraji, is constantly prodding and probing at the track’s lolling balladry until it fragments into scuttering beats.

What sets Body Meat apart, though, isn’t just instrumental acrobatics transposed onto Ableton – as impressive as they no doubt are. It’s the thought in which he allows before hurling his genres together; the depth of understanding behind a drum pattern that wouldn’t sound out of place on Nyege Nyege Tapes; the use of autotune on his vocal that allows him to indulge his unironic love of Boyz II Men to full effect. This is no technical demonstration, and the largely self-taught Taylor talks a lot about “weight” in his music, as opposed to time signatures, key changes or chords.

“I don’t just put something in to show people that I’m good at drums or bass. Everything in my music is for storytelling, so I think of every single sound that’s in the music” he says. “A sound will need to feel lighter here, but then maybe I’ll condense it or loosen it up here in the rhythm depending on where the story’s going. I think of it as, like, light moments, heavy moments and that’s how I write music. I don’t care what the time signature is, I don’t think about the count, it’s really just a feeling.”

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Something also instilled with him from an early age has been to look outside western music for inspiration. It partly comes from an early love of Anime, and Taylor remembers vividly drawing characters, collecting bootleg Dragonball Z cards and immersing himself in the seemingly otherworldly soundtracks that encompassed them. It also came from his father – also an environmental scientist – with Ethiopian heritage, who once played congas for Earth, Wind and Fire and brought back records and other musical trinkets from frequent business trips to Africa. “I think it ties into that idea of trying to find identity through music, so me looking towards African music and Ethiopia and learning from those things is trying to tap into where I’m from, where some of my identity lies,” Taylor says.

Identity, heritage, re-connecting with his past. These are the themes that we keep returning to – and it’s clear that you can place Taylor the artist in two camps. There’s Body Meat; absorbed in the sounds of his local and global community, extracting and re-moulding them to push a futuristic strain of mutated pop. But then there’s also Chris Taylor, embedding these forward-thinking ideas into folk-like stories of identity, finding his personal and cultural past. It’s perhaps a far simpler message than the music that carries it, but it’s the beating heart of this exhilarating project.

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Words: Simon Jaycatling
Photo Credit: Beth Town

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A$AP Rocky has stolen the headlines once again but not in the way fans might expect. The modish Harlem rapper is making a name for himself in the cryptocurrency world, auctioning his limited-edition music as Non-Fungible Tokens. Although he’s not the first musician to take this venturesome leap into the digital world, his honoured status could set the ball rolling for other reputable figures to follow in his footsteps.

NFTs (or Non-Fungible Tokens) are digital collectibles that use blockchain technology like Ethereum and Tezos so they can’t be duplicated, making the product a finite resource due to its limited accessibility. NFTs have the potential to generate huge revenue due to the fact they can’t be reproduced at the hands of forgers. This unreleased content is desirable for the same reason that a signed vinyl record might be desirable to a collector: it’s rare and valuable.

Although copies of these digital files are widely available online, the highest bidder obtains complete ownership of the original file to do with as they please. While these rare files come with exorbitant price tags, they can prove to be fruitful investments in the long run because digital collectors are always willing to pay top dollar for something produced by a reputable artist.

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The stylish rapper is the latest musician to join the trend of releasing content in the form of Non-Fungible Tokens. His debut NFT collection will be made available this week and will include an unreleased snippet of his track ‘Sandman’ which was teased earlier in the year during a virtual event in tribute to his late friend, A$AP Yams.

This development comes only weeks after The Weeknd sold his latest song in the format of NFTs. The atmospheric track – apparently titled ‘Leave You Alone’ – and its accompanied artwork was made available for auction over 24 hours, with the highest bidder purchasing the exclusive ownership for half a million dollars.

This might seem like an extortionate sum of money at face value, especially for something which sounds akin to a throwaway outro from the After Hours album, but consider it like paying for an original Mona Lisa signed by Leonardo Da Vinci himself. With the help of blockchain technology, the owners can rest easier at night knowing their investment is safe from imitation. What’s more, they can decide either to treasure it as a keepsake or eventually sell it off for profit when the market appreciates.

NFTs are not an entirely foreign concept for the music industry – this form of digital auctioning has been around ever since the emergence of online distribution itself. For example, Martin Shkreli brought the only existing copy of Wu-Tang Clan’s seventh studio album, 'Once Upon a Time in Shaolin'. Contained in an embellished silver box, the project was auctioned by the company Paddle8 before it was eventually snatched up by the shameless hedge fund manager for $2 million in 2015. 

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It’s only now with the stark exploitation of profit from middlemen corporations that musicians are waking up to the benefits of using NFTs. A Citigroup report published in August 2018 stated that artists receive only 12% of all the revenue generated in the music industry, notwithstanding the fact that its annual profits exceed $43 billion. These staggering figures reveal that streaming platforms and record labels are milking artists in order to afford the expenses of distribution and production. Therefore, it is no great surprise to find more distinguished artists turning in favour of the digital marketplace.

With the current streaming framework in place, artists with relatively small fanbases make comparatively little alongside the commercial heavyweights of the music industry. The most active streaming service in the world, Spotify, with 299 million monthly users, has an approximate payout of £0.0025 per play. Therefore, a musician must tally one million clicks to earn just £2,500. A campaign group called Justice At Spotify calculated that, “it would take 786 streams to generate enough revenue to buy an average cup of coffee.” If it were not for touring or selling merchandise, many of these artists would struggle to stay financially afloat.

These swindling negotiations have left creators scratching their heads over why they are contributing to an industry which blatantly favours only the top 1% of musicians, while the struggling majority are left competing for leftover crumbs. However, the introduction of NFTs are drastically reshaping the music industry by transferring power back into the hands of the musicians. This new digital platform allows creators to bypass the avaricious claws of these corporate giants and enjoy the fruits of their labour.

The global pandemic has certainly contributed towards this recent surge in popularity for NFTs. Since all tours and festivals have been cancelled over the last year musicians have been left with little choice but to find new means of income elsewhere. With blockchain technology democratizing an industry, “that has historically been kept shut by the gatekeepers,” it’s possible that a larger vanguard of artists will eventually dabble in this digital empire, especially under the current social conditions.

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The reason why NFTs have so much upside potential for reshaping the future of music is because artists can negotiate certain privileges for the highest bidder. For example, musician and producer 3LAU has recently sold an NFT collection worth up to $11.6 million. However, he also announced that the winner of the auction would get the opportunity to feature on his next song. These added utilities are revolutionary, particularly if more recognised musicians continue with this trend. It will increase the demand without the interference of record labels and give wealthy dedicated fans the chance of receiving extraordinary rewards.

Besides the chance of obtaining exclusive ownership to ‘Sandman’, A$AP Rocky has also announced that everyone who purchases the NFT will subsequently be entered into a raffle for the opportunity to win either an exclusive studio session or a customised vehicle from his Injured Generation Tour.

A$AP Rocky’s arrival into the NFT space is a watershed moment for the future of this digital marketplace. Despite a three-year hiatus since his last album Testing, the sleek fashionista is still recognised as one of the most decorated rappers of his generation. His participation in blockchain technology further validates the digital platform, opening doors for other artists to do likewise.

There is no forecasting exactly how far NFTs will affect the music industry but if things continue on the same upward trajectory then it could spell disaster for middlemen corporations. But whatever the future holds for music distribution, this digital platform is not going to disappear any time soon and could well become a linchpin of the industry if more notable artists decide to migrate over to digital auctioning.

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Words: Richard Sayell

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Soulful alt-pop prodigy TYSON has shared her debut EP 'Pisces Problems' in full.

The five song document was constructed alongside close friend Oscar Scheller, with Four Tet producer Kieran Hebden handling mixing duties.

Her single 'Tuesday' is an effervescent anthem, but the emotions on the full EP are mixed – the jealousy of 'Red Handed' for example, or the wistful R&B that drives 'White'.

Never one to be pinned down, 'Pisces Problem' radiates with invention, the sort of songwriting TYSON could only conjure around true friends.

Ending with the rolling snares of 'Chemicals', her sighing vocals seem to emerge through a portal, from some other realm.

It's the time of the season – check out 'Pisces Problems' below.

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Sophia Kennedy is part of the no-rules arts communities that pepper the German city of Hamburg.

Actually born in the States – Baltimore, to be exact – she discovered herself in the city, allowing her music to expand and evolve in the process.

New album 'Monsters' took about three years to construct, whimsical yet experimental synth pop constructions that sit invitingly in the left-field.

Mense Reents of Die Vögel worked on it throughout, helping to push Sophia Kennedy into fresh arenas.

Alongside the way, she absorbed new influences, and re-discovered some old touchstones.

Clash found out more.

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Mina – 'Se Telefonado'

This piece is very moving to me. The structure and build-up of the melody that never seems to end, the composition, the grandeur and the tragedy. I think this piece shows how closely pain and the feeling of liveliness are connected with each other.

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The Tornados – 'Telstar'

I love this piece very much. You can literally hear the ingenious madness of legendary producer and sound pioneer Joe Meek. I think this piece can be interesting for everyone who deals with sound, you can learn a lot from it.

Musically, this piece exhilarates me and describes quite well how I often feel: Wobbly, joyful, slightly off track.

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Tyler, the Creator – 'See You Again' (Ft. Kali Uchis)

His music has been with me for quite a while now since 'Flower Boy'.

His music touches me so strongly because one can hear his conflict between his existence as a rapper, singer, musician and producer. He is everything at the same time. His toughness, pleasure in destruction and also his love for playful, warm and soulful music – I enjoy dwelling in his world and learn from him.

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Mount Kimbie, Micachu – 'Marilyn'

I’ve been listening to this Song so much – I think it is so beautiful and haunting. The sound production is so warm, broken – the vocals by Mica Levi are staggering and have a great affect on me. She’s an absolute legend.

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Ray Charles – 'That Lucky Old Sun'

Makes me cry every time. What a fucking great song.

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'Monsters' is out now.

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Alternative pop singer-songwriter Savannah Conley has today released her sophomore EP, ‘Surprise, Surprise’. Consisting of six singles, the American artist showcases her broad range of sounds, varying from the emotionally rich ballad of 'Not Where I'm Going', to the high energy ‘Dream Boy’, Savannah keeps us on our toes throughout. It’s a release that paints the life of a young artist trying to find her way in the world, navigating every bump in the road that can often seem like a mountain at the time and it all comes together as a deeply emotive and personal journey that shows her genuine talent as a songwriter.

Residing from Nashville, Tennessee, Savannah inherited her talents from a very talented family, giving her the perfect insight into a world she’d later explore. Such was her love for it, the artist started performing at the age of seven and never turned back. "Music has always been a part of my life. My whole family is full of musicians, writers, artists, and makers. It was a very inspiring environment to grow up in, but of course you don’t come to appreciate those things until you’re older.” The artist proclaims, “It always seemed very ordinary to me. But now I know that it’s not only something to be thankful for, but to continue to grow in appreciation for. My family and roots informed everything I’ve done and will do.”

Savannah introduced herself to the world with her debut EP ‘Twenty-Twenty’ in 2018. It was a release that gained significant traction and saw the artist gain plaudits for her unique take on modern day country music. Lead single ‘Never Be Ourselves’ turned many heads for its evocative style, as a whole the release acted as a springboard for the artist’s career.

Now we see a more refined version of the American on ‘Surprise, Surprise’, with a sound that’s developed to feel timeless whilst giving aspects of country music a youthful edge. The artist draws on influences from folk-rock, pop, and country itself that creates her own gentle style. On the thought process behind the EP, Savannah explains: "This EP has come together in the most curvy, winding way that I never could have expected. Everything from the subjects that I wrote about, to the recording, to even the releasing process was nothing I could have planned. I’m so lucky to have gotten to work with the people that I’ve been able to collaborate with, and I’m really proud of how it all turned out. Twists and turns included.”

The artist shows a fearless approach throughout, jumping between sounds and genres, Savannah manages to pull the mood in whichever direction she so chooses. This translates to themes within her songwriting as well, with the tongue-in-cheek title track 'Surprise, Surprise', showing Savannah at her most playful, talking about the inevitable pain that comes with falling in love. Whilst ‘Not Where I’m Going’ shows the opposite, with a vulnerable artist taking to the forefront, second guessing her progress in life, with all her friends settling down already.

What this EP does so well is that it tackles relatable themes around identity and self-reflection that are so important in your 20s. There’s a reason those years are so often described as some of the most difficult you’ll ever face. Nothing’s guaranteed in your career or personal life and everyone around you is moving at different speeds, it’s the perfect recipe for anxiety. Savannah explains what the theme means to her music: “It’s been a continuing process to find my own identity and path while having that sense of self and home. I write a lot of sad songs, but if I really take a step back, I have a lot of shit to be happy about."

‘Surprise, Surprise’ is an introspective release that finds you naturally relating to Savannah. At the age of just 24, she shows so much promise within the realms of her songwriting, perhaps it’s no wonder given she won the John Lennon Songwriting award when she was 19. Clearly improving with each release, honing a beautiful voice and a sonic output dripping in that loveable, southern charm, Savannah Conley looks set to go places.

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'Surprise, Surprise' EP is out now.

Words: Jake Wright

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The latest edition from the adidas x LEGO partnership has been unveiled. The ZX 8000 'Bricks' Collectiom, available in six bold, nostalgic colourways.

Consisting of the primary LEGO brick colours: red, green, yellow, blue, black and grey, the new iteration of the ZX 8000 boasts a classical construction but with a mesh upper and synthetic suede overlays and a TPU heel counter mimicking the texture of LEGO bricks.

Check out LEGO minifigure engineers constructnig the shoes piece by piece in the fun accompanying campaign video. 

 

 
 
 

 

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A post shared by adidas Originals (@adidasoriginals)

 

Available from May 7th at wellgosh.com

 

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Night Time Industries Association Scotland has launched legal action against the Scottish government.

The move comes after weeks of vocal protests from live music bosses, who have warned of "catastrophic" job losses unless the SNP administration changes course.

Night Time Industries Association Scotland represent the interests of countless business across Scotland, and have now served legal papers against their own government.

In a statement, the NTIAS spoke of "an extraordinary sense of disappointment and frustration" as the move went ahead, arguing in favour of a judicial review "challenging the validity of all legal restrictions currently being imposed upon hospitality and night time economy businesses in Scotland".

Calling current support "wholly inadequate" the statement argues that the late-night sector "has been driven to the edge of insolvency by the severe restrictions".

According to the NTIAS, around 39,000 jobs are currently at risk, with the restrictions now out-stripping the support on offer.

The statement reads: "It is therefore the position of the NTIA that the restrictions imposed on hospitality businesses by Scottish Government with regards to capacity, activities and operating hours are no longer justifiable or proportionate and any continued application of such emergency restrictions would now be in breach of Article 1 of the first Protocol to the European Convention on Human Rights, which applies in the UK by virtue of the Human Rights Act 1998."

Business owner Tony Cochrane (Club Tropicana, Dundee, Glasgow, Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Fat Sams Live Dundee, Viennas Paisley, Aura Dundee & Sing City Aberdeen) comments:

Scottish Government’s failure to give the Scottish Nightclub Sector any dates on potential reopening, just a tier system that leaves us the only industry to have forced closure even at level 0 and no clarity on how this system progresses below level 0. Every other sector has a time table to recovery, we have been given nothing.

All financial assistance has stopped and no further offer of funding with months of costs ahead and no income leaving us on the brink of collapse. This frustration of no route map, failure to have constructive dialogue, the threat to our 350 staff’s livelihoods, continued closure, and lack of action to give financial support has led us to having no alternative but to challenge Scottish Government through the legal system.

The SNP government have yet to comment publicly.

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