Cult Italian sportswear brand C.P. Company is launching a new project with Mercury Prize nominee and Clash cover star Slowthai for the brand’s new capsule collection P.Ri.S.M. Inspired by the brand’s ‘Eyes on the City’ series and filmed during the artist’s ‘bet Ya a 5er’ tour, the film follows him throughout the UK as he reflects on his personal journey, career and success so far.

The film features the tracks ‘Gorgeous’ and ‘Inglorious’ from Slowthai’s debut album ‘Nothing Great About Britain’.

P.Ri.S.M celebrates C.P. Company’s expertise in garment dyeing and cements their place as champions of the process and style. Their ‘Prismatic Rip-Stop’ (fun to use, fun to say) membrane, is composed of two-tone ripstop and a polyurethane membrane to help achieve the prismatic final colour at the end of the process, or so the press release tells us.

 

 

The P.Ri.S.M collection will be available from 12th December at cpcompany.com

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Saint DX has shared the powerful, poignant video for 'Xphanie' – tune in now.

The French crooner recently released his debut EP ‘SDX’, a collection of sonorous, emotionally nuanced songwriting.

EP highlight 'Xphanie' became a real favourite with Clash, and we're pleased it has now been given the full video treatment.

It's a beautiful rendering too, with the Julien Pujol directed clip presenting an unflinching, engrossing view of a break up.

Saint DX explains…

“When I met Julien Pujol, I opened up to him about the song Xphanie and everything it represents for me. I told him about X, about our breakup, about this motorbike and this train.”

“He told me that my story reminded him of his very first love story. Most of us have already suffered through a break up. Especially that moment when it is not yet completely over, and we find ourselves face to face, in the same room. We are forced to share a common space while the emotional distance is growing.”

Tune in now.

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Platinum-certified singer, songwriter, and producer Lauv describes the past year as “transformational”.

And taking a look at the amazing things he’s done – be it the success of his single 'fuck, i’m lonely' with Anne-Marie, the 19-city sold-out run of his '~how i'm feeling world tour~', or his much-anticipated feature on the remix of BTS’ ‘Make It Right’ – you’d think it was no surprise. But the year is special for a much more personal reason.

Reflecting on his 2019, he says: “I started the year off in the worst place I’ve ever been in my life, and now I’m ending it really happy, table clear-headed. I went through a lot mentally – dealing with depression and OCD – getting on medication, finding a good therapist, meditating. And now I’d say life is good, there’s nothing I can complain about.”

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Growing over the year as a person and an artist, seems to have helped Lauv come to terms with the different sides of personality. And it’s this wholesome embrace of who he truly is as a person that has become the catalyst for his debut studio album '~how i'm feeling~', set for release on March 6th next year.

Describing the album as “diverse, lit, and emotional”, the 25-year-old pop visionary, further explains: “Each individual track in this album is a great representation of where I am in life, the diversity of my current sound, the different aspects of who I am.”

“There’s a lot pressure to portray yourself according to personality trait or brand. I didn’t want to be pigeonholed, I wanted to make sure that I was showcasing various sides of my personality.”

Lauv’s desire to accept all sides of his personality led to the creation of the visuals that adorn his album cover, known as “little Lauvs” ; these six distinct characters, represented by six different colours embody six different traits that come together to make up the person known as the artist Lauv , and the human Ari Staprans Leff.

Having been introduced properly on the video for the single ‘Sims’, Lauv believes six is the magic number. He explains, “Any more than six would be splitting hairs. Anything further it’d be folded into the six sides that already exist.”

But he’s still above giving up certain traits, if absolutely necessary – the side of him that’s hopelessly romantic. He says: “After I went through a lot in terms of love and life experiences, I think I decided to discover and embrace a lot more than just that side.”

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Even giving up the romantic side of him, his latest release ‘Mean It’ with LANY, proves that he continues to be introspective about the idea of love. Speaking on the inspiration behind the track, he says: “From my perspective it was about what I thought someone I was seeing would say to/about me. I guess it was the same from Paul’s side – but from his perspective.”

Explaining that it’s the different perspectives that makes collaborations a great experience, he says: “Because I write from such a specific angle I forget that other people approach things differently. So being exposed to this other world and perspective is inspiring and I always learn a lot.”

On the topic of collaborations, the two main talking points are who’s on his bucket list – a question answered instantly, “Coldplay’s Chris Martin”- and BTS. Gushing about the septet, Lauv says: “I think meeting them was the last time I was ever starstruck. I don’t think I need to explain why because they are the biggest band in the world!”

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Taking a moment to chat about the ‘Make It Right’ remix, he says: “It was the perfect track for me melodically and vibe-wise , so I thought that was the one for me. I don’t think I could choose any other track that was better suited for me.”

Despite the big-name collaborations, and replay-worthy music, what excites the singer most about his craft is just being able to share it with the world.

Lauv says: “To have a piece of me out in the world, something I care so much about out there for people like or hate is the best part.”

He says “hate” but if the sold-out dates of his tour are anything to go by there aren’t many people out there who dislike his music or him, and the feeling is mutual. Speaking on his favourite part of touring, he says: “The shows are my favourite, that’s the important part. Getting to unfold how I’m doing each night is amazing in front of people who are willing to listen is why I do this.”

Known as the “one-man boyband”, Lauv is unable to pick out a single moment to tag as the pinnacle of his career, and that’s a clear testament to how successful he is. But beyond all that success he’s the guy who spends his free time “getting tattoos, drinking margaritas, playing with my dog, watching shows/movies, skate boarding” and the guy who in his own words “is always doing something because I can be barely be alone” – and these qualities make him all the more likeable.

And if that doesn’t sell you on his genuine personality, his relatable answer to how he detoxes from social media – a question asked given the concept of his single ‘Drugs & The Internet’ – should be enough to convince any cynics. He says: “How do I detox? I don’t! Usually I get to the point where I have a breakdown, post about the breakdown, chill for a day and then I’m back on social media the next day – so not very healthy!”

Sometimes silly and cocky, and sometimes wise beyond his years, Lauv is the kind of person you want to have a lengthy conversation with -about anything from his obsession with sunglasses and his “damn good looks which he was born with” to the path that led him to accept himself- and the answers will either amuse you or touch your heart, there’s no in-between.

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'~how i'm feeling~' will be released on March 6th.

Words: Malvika Padin
Photo Credit: Stefan Kohli

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Did everybody watch the climate debate last night? We sure did, and we’re betting Richard Malone did too. Right on trend, the Irish-born, London-based designer and champion for all things sustainability was today announced as the new ambassador the innovative charity campaign #TogetherBand.

Championing environmental sustainability since his first independent collection for autumn-winter 2015, Malone has been evolving and perfecting his methods of production, now boasting 100% sustainability throughout all of his clothing.

The new charity campaign that boasts Richard as the frontman and ambassador, aims to fulfill one of the UN’s Global Goals for sustainable development. Goal 12 set by the UN focuses on responsible production and consumption.

Launching today, (not so coincidently on Black Friday), #TogetherBand calls on consumers to think before they shop, something we all need a little help with. Thanks to social media, fast fashion and online shopping; we’ve all become party to a seemingly unstoppable force of mass consumerism and irresponsible sourcing practices. With a necessary urgency to tackle issues of fairtrade and unsustainable fabrics and pollution, the campaign shines a light on the estimated £140 million worth of clothing being sent to landfills in the UK alone each year. Speaking on the movement, Malone says ““Nothing should be considered luxurious that is harmful or exploitative” #TogetherBand aims to change our attitudes towards responsible shopping and dressing in nothing short of a desperate situation.

Visit togetherband.org

 

Saint Mars team with music prodigy Tryzdin on new single 'Help'.

The UK band are storming out of the underground, eager to prove themselves with each passing release.

New single 'Help' – no relation to the Beatles' classic single, we trust! – is a truly group effort, with each musician playing a part.

Composed by Marc Darcange alongside Julius Conrad, it features a guest spot from the prodigal talents of Tryzdin.

Rousing, biting songwriting with just an element of pop, 'Help' is a plea you can't ignore. Say the band:

“‘Help’ showcases Tryzdin’s mature and hard-hitting vocals, alongside with an infectious chorus and deceptively uplifting modern pop hooks. The song describes the antagonist nature of relationships based on attraction/repulsion, driven by passion, and prone to breakaways such as bullying and harassment.”

Saint Mars have shot a new video for the song, which you can hear on Clash before anywhere else – tune in now.

Photo Credit: Nick Fancher

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There's a lot of complexity, a swathe of nuance to otta's music.

Never one to be pinned down, the South London cites Matthew Herbert, Dean Blunt and JPEGMAFIA as influences on production, but this is viewed through a lens of classic songwriting.

Debut album ‘after it all blew over’ is marked by this tension, and it's set to land in January through [PIAS] and kwes’s label BOKKLE.

There's much more to come, but it's worth highlighting otta's outstanding new song 'small hours'.

A wonderful miniature, it's creation marked a breakthrough of points, and there's a clear excitement in the act of creation running through otta's work.

otta explains…

“I had always been writing songs on guitar but at this point I was spending a lot of time experimenting making more random music with my friends, we had no real intention of having a structured song within these ideas, it felt great…”

“This was the first time I made a song on Logic and was like “wait, maybe I can just do it myself or even just start to trust the sounds I’m using. I also often find it hard to finish songs and always go off on a tangent, which I guess you can hear in the choruses of some other tracks on the project.”

Tune in now.

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Since being appointed as creative directors at Jil Sander in 2017, husband and wife duo Luke and Lucie Meier have been curating their vision for the house in soft, modern minimalism. Their latest collection for pre-fall 2020 is their most evolved yet, playing with proportions and exploring the relationship between concepts of femininity and masculinity for a harmonious, fluid collection of exaggerated shapes and warm neutrals.

With a clear vision for the modern Jil Sander woman, the collection borrows accents from classic corsetry for seductive, feminine lines and detailing, while linear, elongated silhouettes give power and softness simultaneously.

Jil Sander pre-fall 2020 consists predominantly of a palette of yielding, singular colours, with hints of drama from the geometric designs of the late Austrian artist Maria Lucia Stadimaer printed and delicately layered on sheer fabrics, creating enthralling, vintage-inspired patterns.

A collection of two minds, each look is deliberately sensual and conservative; giving us a glimpse into an on-going debate between rigidity and luminous freedom. The clothing is polished and yet curious, both elegant and unpredictable. Wide necks and balloon sleeves are offset by bold silver detailing and heart-shaped necklines, while statuesque silhouettes and oversized boots contrast with soft, silken fabrics and gentle leathergoods. With this latest line from the German fashion house, the Meiers show us that they have found their footing at Jil Sander, and cemented their place in post-Philo, luxury modernist minimalism. 

Visit jilsander.com

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Remember Remember was a project we weren't about to forget.

The product of Graeme JD Ronald's imagination, it grew from one man and a loop pedal to become a lush, ambitious ensemble.

But all good things come to an end, and with the end of that chapter the Scottish composer relocated, moving to the United States.

The urge to work within music was never dissipated, though, with Graeme JD Ronald electing to continue under his own name.

New album 'Danielle' breaks with his previous work, while still containing many of the creative conduits that made Remember Remember so appealing.

It's a film score project of sorts, echoing a brave, moving documentary shot by Gareth Warland.

A full 12 track album, it's a gorgeous return from a talented composer – Clash caught up with Graeme JD Ronald to uncover a little bit more.

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Enya – 'Boadicea'

When I was younger I would never picture myself unselfconsciously listening to Enya, but the older I get, the more drawn I am to unabashedly Celtic music. I think it happens a wee bit to everyone who moves to America from Scotland or Ireland.

This tune isn't even all that traditional anyway, a wordless vocal and synthesiser hymn – its sparse, eerie, meditative atmosphere helped inform the tune 'Symptoms (Home's Fault)' from the soundtrack.

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David Bowie – 'Warzawa'

Side B of 'Low' has been a perennial influence on me since I first heard it in my twenties. Along with Steve Reich's 'Music For 18 Musicians' it's a sound I've been trying to emulate forever.

'Warzawa' still doesn't sound like any other music I know, the melodies are beamed in from another universe.

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Brian Eno – 'Music For Airports (Movement 1)'

Again, something I discovered in my twenties that left a pretty indelible impression. Making this soundtrack I had to reprogram my brain a bit, when I write music I'm usually very much locked into the importance of strong melodies and a rigid tempo grid.

Too much structure and melody, though, gets in the way of narrative storytelling. The pianos in 'Music For Airports', however, meander around without obvious purpose, I had this tune in my mind when I was writing 'A Wiggly Worm'.

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Laurie Spiegel – 'Patchwork'

Another way I like to unlock my mind out of it's usual musical patterns is to listen to music that is fully synthesised and sequenced, letting the machines take over for a while can suggest ideas that your own brain wouldn't be able to arrive at.

Laurie Spiegel made some of the most entrancing early electronic music that I know of. I couldn't speak to what her own practice is, but I was thinking of this piece when I produced the tune 'Birds', setting a pair of sequenced flute patterns off and letting them sing to one another.

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Cocteau Twins – 'Pearly-Dewdrops' Drops'

In the first conversation that Gareth (Warland, director or 'Danielle') had about the film and our aims for the soundtrack, we discovered that we had a lot of shared musical reference points, and when the 4AD label and The Cocteau Twins in particular came up, something really clicked into place.

There's something in the guitar sound, that ghostly quality… distinctly Scottish but not in a fiddles and bagpipes kind of way.

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'Danielle' is out now.

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Listening to the swirling ambience of 'Everyday Life's orchestral, lyric-less two-minute opening track, a listener would never know that a sweeping commentary on seemingly every global issue was to follow. 'Everyday Life' is not an ambient album – as the first track would suggest – but rather Coldplay’s own misguided stab at social justice through song, one that aims to change the world with a touchy-feely, white-savior-esque, disingenuous call-to-unity that borders a bit on naivety.

Across the 16-song double album, Coldplay cover an impressive amount of thematic ground. Never in the 52 minutes does it sound like they have bit off more than they can chew, but what it does seem they have done is stretched too little into a very thin “too much” – as if they were trying to handle hundreds of years worth of racial tension ('Trouble In Town'), prejudice ('Arabesque'), and complexities of war ('Orphans') into 52 minutes, ending up with a watered-down version of it all.

It’s all dangerously vague, and lumps the “problems of the world” into just that – one mass of "problems" that you think about in theory but forget quickly (especially if they do not immediately concern you), rather than considering the complexities and systems that keep each one of these problems in place.

That said, it would be unfair to let the melodic prowess that Coldplay has shown here go unappreciated. 'Eko' – ignoring the strange lyrics of African pride that a white man has seemed to take on – showcases a soft, acoustic melody that is only enhanced by the beautiful harmony between him and Tiwa Savage. And 'Orphans' – barring its particularly trite pre-chorus – paints a sobering picture of war-torn life for a young girl that juxtaposes well with the upbeat, guitar-driven soundscape behind it.

'Church' is an undeniably ‘Coldplay’ song, with Martin’s signature blooming vocals over riffs that give you a headrush – and is this time bookended by a soothing aria in Arabic.

Despite the album’s missteps, Coldplay manage to find themselves pockets of beauty in the midst of the chaos that they themselves have ironically created, to craft something melodically unique that whisks us back to 2008’s watermark 'Viva La Vida' era.

7/10

Words: Valerie Magan

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Angel Olsen and Charli XCX are amongst the massive list of announcements for Mad Cool 2020.

The Madrid festival is putting itself on the map with some stellar line ups, and next summer looks to be a game-changer.

Taylor Swift and Billie Eilish will hit Madrid for the event, with new additions including wonderful American songwriter Angel Olsen.

UK future-pop force Charli XCX will perform at Mad Cool, with other additions including The Regrettes, Easy Life, and Cherry Glazerr.

Club-centric bookings include Floating Points, Peggy Gou, Leon Vynehall, and techno force Nina Kraviz, adding a fresh dimension to the festival.

It's a huge announcement from the Spanish organisers, with Rex Orange County, Tom Misch, Phoebe Bridgers, Ashnikko, and Highly Suspect.

Tickets go on sale this weekend.

Mad Cool 2020 runs between July 8th – 11th.

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