The Rolling Stones have announced plans for new compilation 'Confessin' The Blues'.

The album will be released on November 9th, and will feature some blues classics spread across two discs.

Ronnie Wood has crafted the cover art, with the rock 'n' roll legends spearheading the arguments over the tracklisting.

Moving from country blues to Chicago's electric revolution and beyond, the album features some classic Stones touchstones alongside some lesser notes gems.

The compilation opens with Muddy Waters' cut 'Rollin' Stone' which gave the band its name, and includes the likes of Howlin' Wolf's 'Little Red Rooster' and Mississippi Fred McDowell's 'You Gotta Move', both later covered by The Rolling Stones.

Mick Jagger was an early fan of the blues, commenting: “The first Muddy Waters album that was really popular was Muddy Waters at Newport, which was the first album I ever bought”.

Keith Richards adds: “If you don't know the blues… there's no point in picking up the guitar and playing rock and roll or any other form of popular music.”

In addition to this, 10% of BMG’s net receipts from the sale of this album will be donated to Willie Dixon’s Blues Heaven Foundation. Jacqueline Dixon, President/CEO of The Blues Heaven Foundation, comments:

"We are extremely honoured, grateful and humbled that Willie Dixon’s Blues Heaven Foundation has been included in such an astonishing project. It means so much that my father’s dream of creating an organisation that promotes, protects and preserves the Blues for future generations is being recognised and supported by artists that have achieved so much."

Out on November 9th, here's the tracklisting:

DISC ONE
1. Muddy Waters – Rollin’ Stone
2 Howlin’ Wolf Little – Red Rooster
3. John Lee Hooker – Boogie Chillen
4. Little Walter – Hate To See You Go
5. Chuck Berry – Little Queenie
6. Bo Diddley – You Can’t Judge A Book By It’s Cover
7. Eddie Taylor – Ride ‘Em On Down
8. Slim Harpo – I’m A King Bee
9. Magic Sam – All Your Love
10. Elmore James – Dust My Broom
11. Little Walter – Just Your Fool
12. Muddy Waters – I Want To Be Loved
13. Big Bill Broonzy – Key To The Highway
14. Robert Johnson – Love In Vain Blues
15. Mississippi Fred McDowell – You Gotta Move
16. Jimmy Reed – Bright Lights, Big City
17. Big Maceo – Worried Life Blues
18. Little Johnny Taylor – Everybody Knows About My Good Thing (Part 1)
19. Howlin’ Wolf – Commit A Crime
20. Otis Rush – I Can’t Quit You Baby
21. Jay McShann & Walter Brown – Confessin’ The Blues

DISC TWO
1. Howlin’ Wolf – Just Like I Treat You
2. Little Walter – I Got To Go
3. Chuck Berry – Carol
4. Bo Diddley – Mona
5. Muddy Waters – I Just Want To Make Love To You
6. Elmore James – Blues Before Sunrise
7. Eddie Taylor – Bad Boy
8. Boy Blue – Boogie Children
9. Jimmy Reed – Little Rain
10. Robert Johnson – Stop Breakin’ Down Blues
11. Reverend Robert Wilkins – The Prodigal Son
12. Lightnin’ Slim – Hoodoo Blues
13. Billy Boy Arnold – Don’t Stay Out All Night
14. Bo Diddley – Craw Dad
15. Dale Hawkins – Suzie Q
16. Amos Milburn – Down The Road Apiece
17. Howlin’ Wolf – Little Baby
18. Little Walter – Blue And Lonesome
19. B.B. King – Rock Me Baby
20. Buddy Guy – Damn Right I’ve Got The Blues
21. Muddy Waters – Mannish Boy

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Brooklyn's Yoke Lore has enjoyed a stellar year so far.

Each day seems to find more fans uncovering his music, with none other than Taylor Swift amongst the latest to voice their approval.

New EP 'Absolutes' is out now, with the resolutely independent pop voice retaining his early focus while adding some sparkling fresh elements.

A tantalising glimpse of what might lie ahead, it's sparked by indie songwriting, by dream pop textures, by an innate grasp of melancholy, and by a desire to pursue pop perfection.

Clash caught up with Yoke Lore to explore a few of his Influences…

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M83 – 'Kim And Jessie'

I get compared to M83 a lot, and honestly, I don't reeeeally see it. But it feels like a huge compliment, so I take it. I'm starting to think that maybe Yoke Lore doesn't so much sound like M83 as it kind of references the way M83 creates these super vast spaces to engulf a listener in. Or, at least, I hope that's an aspect that my music draws from. That's what I love and admire about their work.

They have these super intimate moments where Anthony Gonzales is almost whispering, but then those moments explode and give way to mountains of sound, and you get to occupy all the space in between. It's a wild and beautiful thing.

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Modest Mouse – 'Heart Cooks Brain'

Modest Mouse was a young love. I was into punk music when I was little, but I guess I didn't really find my place in it until I located the punk attitude in other genres and sonic disguises.

I saw Modest Mouse as a punk band whose words I could understand and sing back to. I grew up listening to musical theater in family car rides so finding a singer who sounded strange and captivating was so contra to what I had known singers to be, and to me that was like the apex of rebellion.

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Ibeyi – 'Ghosts'

I want to bring some substance back to pop music with the sounds I make and the words I write. Pop music is such a huge platform and hosts such a wide audience, why not spread good challenging ideas for young people to sink their teeth and ears into.

I think Ibeyi is doing this. They are telling real stories with progressions that draw on binding family traditions and melodies that come from the past. They are true teachers.

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Band Of Horses – 'Infinite Arms'

People always compare me to Band Of Horses as well, so I might as well address it. First of all, I love them. I think they use classical Americana sounds in such a wildly innovative way. Ben Bridwell's voice is at the same time longing and triumphant. They make complexity seem like simplicity and offer everyday experience that becomes transformed by their anthemic presentation of it. They offer nostalgia. I think this is where we cross paths.

For some reason, I write chords that can easily be called sad. There is a distant hope to them, but that hope is far off yet. Absolutes is about times when I've had to realize that things aren't pure or one sided. There is hope in those moments, but it's also a letting go of something. You have to let the old parts of yourself die to let new parts of yourself grow.

I think there is a bit of this sad but hopeful feeling in a lot of their music, and I've realized that I tend toward it, too.

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Animal Collective – 'Grass'

Animal Collective has always been and will always be a beacon for me. Their music combats the world is soft beautiful ways that leave both fighters enlightened with new insights. I can remember specific times when I heard specific songs of theirs for the first time and 'Bluish' is one of those songs. Their music has become a way to remember myself.

I was in my best friend's freshman dorm of Kenyon College in Ohio watching a candle float around a bucket of water, and we had done a drug that hadn't really worked. We all just sat around and watched the floating candle anyway cause the whole album was so wonderful and fresh and made us consider things. It was a good moment.

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Yoke Lore's new EP 'Absolutes' is out now.

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Leeds group FEHM are currently working on their new record. Holed up in the studio, the band are engaging on an inward journey, a kind of creative introversion that will – hopefully – propel them forwards.

Set to play a string of dates this August – including a hometown show, naturally – FEHM are ready to sneak out something new.

'The Sea To Come' matches post-punk noise to a romantic sense of longing, the oceanic splendour of the production sitting against that riveting vocal.

It's a brooding, bruising return, one marked by a desire to communicate something universal in an unconventional manner.

Frontman Paul Riddle:

'The Sea To Come' is primarily a love song written in an unconventional way. It flutters through times of struggle whilst knowing, whoever it may be, at any cost, will always be there for you…

Tune in now.

Catch FEHM at the following shows:

August
2 Hull The New Adelphi
3 Leeds The Brudenell Social Club (Free entry with support from Drahla)
9 Newcastle The Underground
10 Manchester The Castle
11 London The Castle

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As the title suggests, The Orb’s fifteenth studio outing ‘No Sounds Are Out Of Bounds’ is a record protruding with a plethora of sonic highways.

From the pulsating rhythms of ‘Pillow Fight @ Shag Mountain’ to the hip-hop channelling ‘Wolfbane’, right back to superb and varied closer ‘Soul Planet’, The Orb want you to try everything.

While this ‘everything but the kitchen sink’ ethos doesn’t always hit, ‘No Sounds Are Out Of Bounds’s jovial attitude towards its own self-existence makes for an endearing listen that’ll no doubt flourish over time.

7/10

Words: Liam Egan

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Gorgeously eccentric and cogently mismatched, Dirty Projectors’ eighth album ‘Lamp Lit Prose’ is an achievement in glitch-pop. Decades after dial-up left the mainstream sonic atmosphere, David Longstreth’s experimental collective brings the prior strength of the project into its newest incarnation.

The return of guitars to Dirty Projectors’ lineup brings a dimension of reality to the record, while maintaining the bizarre futurism clear throughout its ten songs. There is a stylistic evolution at work here; a renaissance of hope, humility, and happiness. Through mosaic production and multifaceted guests, Longstreth’s enigmatic and effluvient effort is a monumentally optimistic record – nothing short of ecstatic.

Entangled with Americana and soul, the happiness of ‘Lamp Lit Prose’ converses with musical periods long gone. Trends that have influenced modern music are conversed with; the dialogue between times gone by and times yet to come is astounding. Nothing sounds like anything that precedes it, and nothing sounds like anything that is on the horizon.

‘Lamp Lit Prose’ simultaneously synchronises climates from the past, present, and future, amalgamating on a record that is proudly cheerful. Everything feels so much more alive, everything so much more stark; Longstreth seems to have emerged from a year-long slumber, and there is no more sleeping in sight.

8/10

Words: Erin Bashford

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I'm not sure at what point 'Tarantino' turned from a famed director into a genre of music, but here we are in 2018 with a record that can comfortably be described as peak Tarantino. 'Mattiel' is a familiar cocktail of dusty horns, dustbowl blues and Dusty Springfield-style '60s pop that almost screams out for accompanying widescreen vista or Mexican standoff. There's even the odd production choice of ending songs while they're in the process of fading out, as if to cut to the next scene.

Mattiel herself boasts a voice to break mixing desks with, rightly garnering herself Nancy Sinatra comparisons for her imperious, room-silencing delivery. The scorn that drips from her tongue on 'Not Today' is acidic and delicious in equal measure, scathingly explaining that she has better things to do today than see her boyfriend's shitty band play.

After years of straining to hear women whispering over deceptively intrusive bass-synths, it's good to have a singer willing to ride so roughshod over tracks, Florence Welch-style. Sure it's not easy to have much range when your vocals are stuck on full throttle. But when you've got a voice born to fill a 2.76:1 aspect ratio, what can you do?

7/10

Words: Josh Gray

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Ben Chatwin recently released his album 'Staccato Signals' to widespread acclaim, the sound of a producer challenging himself once more.

Surprising, though, he wasn't done there. Re-entering the parts for the record, he found renewed space, deconstructing each aspect to form something new.

Incoming record 'Drone Signals' is both a partner to and directly connected with his recent LP, but finds Ben Chatwin casting his work in a new light.

Out via Village Green on September 14th, it began as an experiment. Ben explains: "'Drone Signals' came into being after initially trying out some alternate arrangements for some of the more string-heavy tracks from 'Staccato Signals'. Letting the string quartet performances breathe and allowing a bit more space and depth led to an interesting take on the aggressive and dense mixes that formed the previous album."

He continues: "As a whole new album started to take shape, the arrangements became more severe, ripping the tracks apart and putting them back together in completely new ways."

Clash is able to premiere the sweeping distortion of 'Bone', matching granulated noise to some blossoming string arrangements.

"With 'Bone' I removed everything but the string quartet part from the 'Staccato…' track 'Fossils' and started to record new parts around it," he explains. "Unlike most of the other tracks on 'Drone…' this too became a thickly textured track as I again engulfed the strings with a variety of synthetic textures allowing the strings to rise above it all for a brief moment towards the end of the track, resulting in what is probably the most dramatic moment on 'Drone Signals'."

Tune in now.

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Young Waters have a refreshing, completely natural sound.

The five piece have an organic approach, allowing each song to fall into its right place.

Winning Bath Folk Festival’s New Shoots competition, the band are worth comparing to innovators such as Incredible String Band and Pentangle, alongside newcomers like Fleet Foxes and even composers such as Philip Glass.

The band's self-titled album will be released on September 28th, following hectic recording sessions; six tracks from the album were recorded in one day at the legendary Real World Studios, and the other two were recorded in Norton St Philip Church.

We're able to share new song 'Swimming Pool', a beautiful offering that is pastoral of arrangement and dexterous of lyric.

The production is crisp, fresh, while the resulting visuals build on the inherent mystery of the songwriting itself.

Tune in now.

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Pulp and Happy Mondays are set to take part in a new edition of Bargain Hunt.

The BBC show is a daytime TV staple, a favourite of kids pulling sickies, adults skiving work, and whoever else happens to be at home.

An upcoming edition is set to feature two magnificent British groups, with Pulp and the Happy Mondays going toe-to-toe in the search for cut-price antiques.

Pulp will be represented by Jarvis Cocker and Candida Doyle, while Bez and Rowetta Idah will fly the flag for Madchester types Happy Mondays.

Part of a special day-long event from the BBC, other shows planned include an edition of Pointless featuring Shaun Keaveny, Lianne La Havas, Amy Macdonald, Leslie Garrett and Ella Eyre, while Woman’s Hour will publish the Women in Music Power List – “celebrating the Top 40 female voices in music, from songwriters and performers to managers and producers”.

All shows will be broadcast as part of BBC Music Day on September 28th.

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Sleaford Mods have shared plans for a new self-titled EP.

Working with Rough Trade Records, the new five track EP emerges on September 14th, following sessions in Nottingham earlier in the year.

Jason Williamson explains…

“The lead tracks are mostly full of violent tendencies that only transpire through imagination. People are powerless under the political monster and the intense anger and frustration morphs into illusions of attacking each other through the bravado of social media, depression and paranoia.”

New track 'Stick In A Five And Go' is online now, a bruising return, spitting truth at every angle while the undulating production twists and turns in fresh directions.

Tune in now.

Catch Sleaford Mods at the following shows:

September
21 London Roundhouse*
22 London Roundhouse
30 Nottingham Royal Concert Hall

*support from Lankum

For tickets to the latest Sleaford Mods shows click HERE.

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