Tuborg Reader Review - Peter, Bjorn and John

By Clash Reader Greg Forsyth
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Swedish folk-pop trio Peter, Bjorn and John headed up a slightly odd line-up at the Forum on Sunday night. First up were their fellow countrywomen Those Dancing Days, an all-girl group who my mate was convinced were called ‘Doors,’ because that’s what it said at the top of the running orders pinned up everywhere - “Doors: 7pm.” Doh.

They were about as different from Jim Morrison’s band as you could imagine, poppy and girly, not unlike the Go-Gos in fact. Frontwoman Linnea was a little statuesque, but perhaps that’s a Swedish thing. Her bandmates compensated with some nice formation dancing.

Next up were Maps, who were nominated for the Mercury Prize a few months back so must have been a bit put out not to be headlining. Perhaps they arranged this gig before the nominations were announced. If so, any narkiness didn’t show, as the band looked to be enjoying their stint in a decent-sized venue, even if their more intricate stuff got lost in the rafters at times.

Maps are more suited to an intimate venue really, as their sound is atmospheric and main-man James has a nice-but-gentle voice, which gets a bit lost in a bigger place. He was drowned out by all the chatter here.

Most of the audience were presumably Peter, Bjorn and John fans then, or at least fans of their enormous hit. Their set started promisingly enough, as they walked on to a sitar cover of said hit, then rattled through a few of their pleasant three-minute pop songs. The crowd started chatting amongst themselves again after a while though, as the trio failed to really fill the room with sound. Then fellow Swede Robyn arrived on stage and we were into the much-anticipated Young Folks, which, of course, when down a storm.

As soon as that song finished, however, about a third of the crowd upped and left, despite the band only being about two-thirds of the way through their set, which probably tells you exactly how ubiquitous that tune is.

At Kentish Town tube station afterwards there was some very familiar whistling going on.

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