Top 25 Movie Music Moments Part 3

From black detectives to ODs
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Continuing out countdown of the Top 25 Movie Music Moments we take in such classic films as 'Harold & Maude', 'Withnail & I', 'Shaft', 'Reservoir Dogs' and 'Pulp Fiction'

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Read the first part of our rundown HERE and the second part HERE.

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15. HAROLD & MAUDE: CAT STEVENS - ‘TROUBLE’



In this life-affirming romantic comedy about a boy who stages fake suicides and a free spirited eighty-year-old woman, all songs are by Stevens. But it’s the finale, with it’s montage placement shots and hold-your-breath ending, played out to the gorgeous ‘Trouble’ that leaves us bewitched. 

AW

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14. WITHNAIL AND I: KING CURTIS - ‘WHITER SHADE OF PALE’




King Curtis’ beautiful rendition of Procul Harum’s ‘Whiter Shade Of Pale’ sets a sophisticated tone in the opening scene of this boozy black comedy; within minutes, Withnail and Marwood are demanding booze and complaining of weird thumbs. Anachronistically, this track was recorded in 1971 - the film itself being set in 1969.

BH

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13. SHAFT: ISAAC HAYES - ‘THEME FROM SHAFT’




The eponymous, preposterous, full on dirty wah-wah funk of ‘Shaft’ is frankly peerless. Ponder the film and you immediately think black leather clad badass detective, you think serious afros, you think big collared shirts, but most of all you think of Isaac Hayes’ award-winning song. Ya damn right!

AW

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12. RESERVOIR DOGS: STEALERS WHEEL - ‘STUCK IN THE MIDDLE WITH YOU’




It’s a jaunty juxtaposition, Super Sounds Of The ’70s spinning the sprightly Stealers Wheel across the airwaves as Michael Madsen embarks on his ominous yet comical cut-throat razor dance towards the unfortunate policeman he’s tied to a chair. You know it’s not going to end well and it doesn’t.

AW

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11. PULP FICTION: URGE OVERKILL - ‘GIRL, YOU’LL BE A WOMAN SOON’




Quentin Tarantino’s love for undiscovered rock curios has informed many of his soundtrack selections. He purchased a second-hand copy of Urge Overkill’s EP ‘Stull’ and subsequently used the opening track, their take on Neil Diamond’s hit, to accompany Uma Thurman’s iconic sizzling solo dance scene. It doesn’t end well…

BH

Stay tuned across this week as the rundown continues.

Compiled and written by Anna Wilson
Contributors: Ben Hopkins, Paul Weedon, Rob Dabrowski

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